WILPF U.S. Section Statement on the 10th Anniversary of SCR1325 (October 31, 2010)

The Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF), U.S. Section, calls upon the U.S. Permanent Mission to the United Nations to fully support women’s participation in peace and security processes, as mandated by United Nations Security Resolution 1325.

On October 26, 2010, the United Nations Security Council commemorated the 10-year anniversary of the unanimous adoption of U.N. Security Council Resolution 1325. Hailed in 2000 as a landmark in putting women’s participation, protection and relief and recover priorities on the security agenda, SCR 1325’s implementation over the past 10 years has been dire:

  • Only 3% of signatories to peace agreements are women;
  • Of 300 peace accords since 1998, a mere 18 reference sexual or gender-based violence;
  • Of the 192 Member States of the U.N., only 20 have National Action Plans for the implementation of UN SCR 1325—the United States has yet to develop its own SCR 1325 NAP.

As a permanent member of the Security Council, the U.S. must bring to bear to the fullest extent its influence and resources to advance the women, peace and security agenda.
In today’s world, civilians make up 90% of the causalities of war, with women and children comprising the largest share of that number.  Women and children make up 80% of those displaced by conflict. As the tragic events this summer in DR Congo show us, women are special targets for sexual violence as a tactic of war.

Women must be included in all aspects of peace and security, as mandated in UN SCR 1325. They must have a place at the peace table as equal participants, and they must be protected from violence and their specific needs attended to in relief and recovery.  States must ensure systematic implementation by developing National Action Plans with timelines and indicators for accountability.

On October 26, the Security Council was presented with important tools to get SCR 1325 on track so it can have an impact on women’s lives around the world. The U.S. must step up in a leadership role by embracing these tools and further committing to actions in support of women’s participation and protection and conflict and post-conflict settings.
The WILPF U.S. Section, calls upon the U.S. to:

  • Fully adopt the UN SCR 1325 indicators, requested by the Security Council last year in Security Council Resolution 1889. The 26 indicators cover women’s protection from gender-based violence in conflict, their participation as decision makers in peace processes, their special needs in relief and recovery, and their unique role in preventing conflict. The indicators are an important step in bringing accountability for implementation for SCR 1325, as the Resolution currently lacks enforcement to its obligations.
     
  • Fully endorse and urge immediate action on the implementation of the Secretary General’s 7-Point Action Plan on women and peacebuilding. Based on the Secretary General’s Report, Women’s Participation in Peacebuilding, the Action Plan provides concrete measures for getting SCR 1325 implementation on track—including obligating 15% of budgets specifically to women’s empowerment and using temporary special measures as needed to ensure women’s substantive participation in peace and governance processes.
     
  • Fund a generous share of the $5 million budget of the newly-established U.N. Women to ensure it can do its job, including making sure women and their issues are included in the peace and security agenda. The U.S. was a champion for the creation of U.N. Women, and it is time to shoulder a generous share of the budget and to urge other members of the Security Council—especially permanent members—to do the same. The Security Council owes it to the women of DR Congo, who were left unprotected against war crimes and crimes against humanity just miles from a U.N. Peacekeeping mission.
     
  • Ten years and two wars down the road, the United States has still not developed a SCR 1325 Action Plan, as urged by the Secretary General in 2006. The U.S. Department of State must immediately develop a National Action Plan, focusing on both national and international policy concerns. Any plan must be done in consultation with civil society in the U.S. and in conflict settings where the U.S. is engaged, including Afghanistan and Iraq.

Women must be included in all aspects of peace and security, as mandated in UN SCR 1325. They must have a place at the peace table as equal participants, and they must be protected from violence and their specific needs attended to in relief and recovery. States must ensure systematic implementation by developing National Action Plans with timelines and indicators for accountability.

As the Security Council has primary responsibility for the maintenance of international peace and security, the world powers who hold permanent seats on the Security Council also holds a permanent mandate to ensure peace is sustainable by including women. The United States has a leadership role to play here, by standing for peace by standing with women on October 26.

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